Courses and Timetables

INTRODUCTORY COURSES

Students who wish to major/double major in Politics and Public Administration must successfully complete POLI1003 in semester I or II.

Unless otherwise specified, the final grading for each course will be determined by performance in the examination and assessment of coursework in a ratio to be announced by individual course instructors at the beginning of each semester.

POLI1003. Making sense of politics (6 credits)

It is an introductory course offered to students with no previous background in political science. It covers the basic concepts, institutions and processes that one would encounter in the study of politics. Emphasis will be placed on the application of concepts to current issues, including (but not restricted to) that of Hong Kong .

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

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ADVANCED COURSES

Unless otherwise specified, the final grading for each course will be determined by performance in the examination and assessment of coursework in a ratio to be announced by individual course instructors at the beginning of each semester.

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Compulsory course

POLI2104. Research methods in politics and public administration (6 credits)

Political scientists use a variety of methods to describe and explain political phenomena. Each method has its own purposes, assumptions, and limitations. This course covers the methods most commonly used in the study of politics and policies. Topics include the nature of scientific inquiry; measurement and causal inference; the conduct of case studies and field research; the design of surveys and experiments; the description and analysis of data; and research ethics. The course has a practical bent: its goal is to equip students with a working knowledge to put the methods to actual use.

Assessment: 100% coursework

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Gateway courses

POLI2105. Introduction to comparative politics (6 credits)

This course introduces students to a thematic approach in understanding politics in comparative settings. Drawing upon examples from liberal democracies, illiberal democracies and authoritarian states, the course examines the characteristics of the main political institutions and processes of the states, including political culture, political participation, the media, political parties, elections, the legislatures and executives. It compares how the various types of states govern, the types of political goods they can probably deliver and their drawbacks. Overall, it explores which way(s) is the best, and if democracy is universally applicable.


Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI2106. Introduction to international relations (6 credits)

In this course students will be introduced to the central concepts in, and theoretical approaches to, the study of world politics both in historical and contemporary contexts. The first five classes will focus on the evolution of world politics as well as the concepts and predominant theoretical approaches used by students of international relations to understand and explain the field. The course then will explore specific issues in international relations. These include: the study of foreign policy and decision‐making; international ethics; international economy; causes of conflict, war and peace; new security issues; and issues of global governance. Throughout the course students will be challenged to think critically about world politics and hone specific academic skills. The course provides a foundation for further study in world politics.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI2107. Introduction to political theory (6 credits)

This course addresses some fundamental questions in the field of political theory: Why do we need the state? How to justify it? Who should rule? What rights and liberties should citizens have? What are the obligations and responsibilities that citizens owe to one another? Through addressing these questions this course provides students with a broad introduction to the major concepts and thinkers associated with western political theory – concepts such as authority, democracy, liberty, rights, justice and property, and thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau and Mill.

This is a “gateway” course, and it is recommended that students complete this course before enrolling in any other political theory classes.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI2108. Introduction to public administration (6 credits)

The purpose of this gateway course is to introduce students to the fundamental concepts and theories of public administration. Students will gain an overview of both issues and practices related to the public administration. The course focuses on the traditions, environment, politics, and core functions of public administration.

Eligibility: Students who have taken POLI1002 are not allowed to take this course.
Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination


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Capstone courses

POLI4092. Capstone experience: research internship in politics and public administration (6 credits)

Students will have the opportunity to perform basic research under the supervision of a faculty member. The internship includes meeting individually with the supervisor, reading relevant materials, assisting in an ongoing empirical research project, and writing an internship report.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI4109. Capstone experience: directed project in politics and public administration (6 credits)

Students will do an empirical research project on a specific topic under a teacher’s supervision. The project involves meeting with the supervisor, reading relevant theoretical and empirical articles, conducting empirical research projects, and writing a project report.

Assessment: 100% coursework

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Elective courses

POLI3001. Special topics in political science: decision making in foreign policy (6 credits)

How do countries make decisions? What explains the foreign policy of states in the international system? This course examines the major theories of foreign policy decisions making including, rational choice, bureaucratic politics, group think as well as psychological and environmental factors that influence decision making. The various theoretical approaches are applied to historical case studies to test the empirical validity of different theories. A decision making simulation game will be used to help apply and understand the various models.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination.

POLI3002. Special topics in political theory: Course description Just War Theory (6 credits)

The past decades saw a rise in philosophical interest in the moral issues raised by war. This course provides an introduction to three major theoretical approaches to war (realism, pacifism, just war theory) and explores, in more detail, the three branches of contemporary just war theory: jus ad bellum, jus in bello, and jus post bellum. Subtopics will include aggression and self-defense, humanitarian intervention, subsistence wars, the principle of discrimination, the moral equality of combatants, post war obligations, regime change, and criminal responsibility.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3004. Bureaucracy and the public (6 credits)

This course examines the political, legal and social dimensions of interaction between bureaucracies and the public. Consideration will be given to the effectiveness of complaint handling institutions, such as the ombudsman, Freedom of Information Acts, secrecy provisions and the roles played by street level bureaucrats.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3005. Capitalism and social justice (6 credits)

This course discusses the morality of capitalism with reference to such issues as exploitation, social justice and equality. Topics include the philosophical defence of free-market capitalism, egalitarian theories of social justice, Marxist critique of capitalism, the concept of exploitation, and welfare rights.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3010. Democracy and its critics (6 credits)

This course discusses basic and practical issues concerning the nature, justification, and limits of democracy. Topics include the concept and foundations of democracy, participatory democracy, the elitist challenge to democracy, Marxist critique of capitalist democracy, rational choice approaches to democracy, and others.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3012. East Asian political economy (6 credits)

This course aims to examine the political processes that underlie the rapid economic transformation of East Asian countries. We will mainly cover Japan and the newly industrializing economies, namely Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and South Korea, but comparisons with China and other emerging economies such as Malaysia and Thailand will also be made. We will first introduce the salient features of the East Asian model of development and we will then analyze the pattern of political development, the relations between the state and other political actors, the development of administrative system, as well as the impact of international relations and strategic factors on the domestic political and economic processes of these cases.

Eligibility: Students who have taken FOSS0010 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3015. Ethics and public affairs (6 credits)

This course examines major public issues in contemporary societies from the perspectives of ethics and political theory. It aims to enhance students’ abilities to critically analyze controversial ethical issues in public affairs. Topics include the nature and methods of moral arguments, major approaches in ethics and political theory, and selected studies of current public issues in the fields of global ethics, market ethics, and political and administrative ethics.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3019. Hong Kong and the world (6 credits)

Hong Kong's international character has been vital to its prosperity and vitality. While Hong Kong's ‘foreign affairs portfolio’ is controlled by China, Hong Kong retains considerable autonomy in shaping its international destiny. What global course should Hong Kong leaders chart? This class will examine the Special Administrative Region's unique international status, its complex identity as a Chinese world city and its track record in facing the challenges and opportunities associated with today's highly interdependent global system.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3020. Hong Kong politics (6 credits)

This course focuses on the legal, political and institutional structure of the Hong Kong government. The political culture and attitudes of the Hong Kong people are discussed. Other topics include the Chief Executive, legislative politics, constitutional politics, public opinion, pressure groups, political parties, mass media, and Beijing's policy toward Hong Kong.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3022. Contemporary Chinese politics (6 credits)

This course is an introduction to contemporary Chinese politics. The main objective is to understand the ideology, institutions and processes of the contemporary Chinese political system and explore the socio-economic consequences, achievements, and problems of socialism with Chinese characteristics.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3023. Special Topic in Chinese Politics: Deciphering Changes and Continuities of Key Policy Issues in the Reform Era (6 credits)

This course should enable students to appreciate and develop an in-depth understanding of key policy issues and decisions in China's reform era from 1978 to the present. There are no prerequisites. One theme that runs throughout the course is the dichotomy of policy change and continuity, drawing implications from the paradox of political limitations on reform while critically evaluating the trends and patterns of major policies and events. Issues to be explored include: the role of law and implications of developing law-based governance; the evolving dynamics of the political economy; mechanisms of political control and autonomy; crisis management; the impact of China's rise on her domestic policy decisions and foreign relations; and major challenges and prospects of key Chinese political institutions and processes.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3024. Special topics in public administration: institutional analysis for reform (6 credits)

This course will focus on some major topics in public administration.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3025. Managerial skills in public organizations (6 credits)

This course focuses on the activities and functions of managers in public organizations. Emphasis is put on the environment and context within which public managers operate, and the various managerial skills and tools that are essential to effective public managers. Students are expected to acquire skills to manage conflicts, lead, manage resources, communicate, and make decisions in the context of public organizations. Reference is made to the experiences in various public or non-profit organizations in Hong Kong.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3027. Public policy-making: theories and application (6 credits)

This course is designed to introduce students to major theoretical frameworks that have been devised to understand and explain public policy-making. The main questions asked are: why are certain policies made instead of others? What are the major factors that affect public policy-making? Empirical studies from both Hong Kong and elsewhere are included to illustrate the application of the theories.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3031. Politics of economic reform in China (6 credits)

This course examines the politics of economic reform in contemporary China. Issues covered include: the connections between politics and economics, the political debates over economic reforms, the rationale and themes of the economic reform programme, and the social and political consequences resulting from the implementation of these reforms. Reform policies to be studied include rural reform, enterprise reform, central-local relations as well as foreign economic policy.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3034. Public administration in China (6 credits)

This course aims to examine the context, structure, people and important issues in managing the public sector in contemporary China. The course provides students a basic understanding of China’s public administration system and its reforms. Several very important topics will be covered, including the relationship between the Party and the government, government structure and intergovernmental relations, and how to manage public employees, and key issues in policy-making and implementation in contemporary China. This course encourages students to conduct group project, which will allow students to learn public policy analysis targeting real hot issues unfolding during China’s reform era. Sample policy areas include food safety management, waste management and crisis management. The newly emerged modes of public service delivery in China will also be discussed.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3035. Public administration in Hong Kong (6 credits)

This course will provide an overview of some of the major issues in public administration and public policy in Hong Kong. Topics may include: the public administrative system of Hong Kong; the budgetary system and public financial policy; the Principal Officials Accountability System and its impact on executive leadership and the relationship between politics and administration; public service ethics; the recent trends of public sector reform; civic engagement and public governance.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3037. Managing people in public organizations (6 credits)

This course seeks to improve students’ capacities to analyze and interpret the context, institutions, processes and key issues in the management of people in public organizations with special reference to Hong Kong from the perspective of agency theory. There are two guest lectures offered by public managers. By the end of the course, students should be able to critically evaluate the control and accountability problems involved in managing the public sector work force and strategies to overcome them. Students should also be able to analyze and evaluate cases in public sector human resource management.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3039. Public policy analysis (6 credits)

This is an introductory course to public policy analysis with an emphasis on the production of advice for decision-makers. This course builds foundations of public policy analysis by covering related political and economic theories and concepts. Having answered why we need government intervention in solving public policy problems, this course also seeks to equip students with skills and techniques to analyze, design, and assess policy options.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3040. Public sector management (6 credits)

Public administration is conducted through a variety of public organizations and institutional arrangements that collectively constitute the public sector. This course aims to provide students an understanding on the key issues of public sector management. It is structured into four parts: (1) the scope and structure of public sector, including the features and operation of various types of public organizations; (2) the human resource management issues within public organizations; (3) various modes of public service delivery; and (4) public sector reform strategies. Reference is made to the experience in Hong Kong.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3044. American democracy (6 credits)

American politics captivates domestic and international audiences. In order to construct informed opinions on the American political process, what should students outside of the United States know about institutions in the US government and the US political system? The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to American politics, with a focus on the dynamic among various political institutions. Students will learn about the philosophical and constitutional basis of the American political system, the contours of American federalism, the interaction between the formal (executive, judiciary, and legislative) and informal (bureaucracy, media, interest groups and general electorate) branches of government in the US, and how elections reveal the internal dynamics of the American political system.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3047. United States foreign policy (6 credits)

How does one make sense of the seeming "arrogance" of U.S. foreign policy? By enhancing student understanding of the causes and consequences of American international political choices, this course seeks to groom well-informed and objective critics of U.S. foreign policy. The course will examine the intellectual foundations associated with and the domestic political actors involved in U.S. international policy formulation and implementation. Students will then have the opportunity to apply this knowledge in a critical evaluation of some of the major international policy decisions made by the U.S. since WWII. The course will conclude with a discussion of the future of U.S. foreign policy, paying particular attention to the impact of the 9-11 attacks on the American world view.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination.

POLI3051. Issues in Chinese political philosophy (6 credits)

A comparative study of Chinese and Western political philosophy, with special emphasis on Confucianism and liberalism. Topics include the nature of classical Confucian political thought, the developments of the Confucian traditions in response to local political changes and to the challenges presented by western liberalism, the contemporary discourse on Confucianism and human rights, freedom, and democracy, and other related issues. Reference will be made to Chinese materials.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination.

POLI3052. International relations of East Asia (6 credits)

This course helps students to have a better understanding of major trends and issues in international relations of East Asia. Instead of providing a comprehensive survey of the history, culture, and national policies of countries in the region, it mainly addresses four issues in the course: What are major trends in regional IR? What is the source of conflict in the region? What are the common interests that unite peoples and states of East Asia? How does the region organize itself? It explains dynamics and patterns of regional international relations in a broad geopolitical and geoeconomic context. Topics in discussion include major powers’ role in the region, the Korean Peninsula, the Taiwan Strait, ASEAN, Southeastern Asia and regional institution-building.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination.

POLI3059. China and the world (6 credits)

China’s place in the world has changed dramatically since the establishment of the People’s Republic of China in 1949. How do we account for the transformation of the country’s position from being a Soviet ally challenging the West, to an independent radical revolutionary state, and then a reform-minded country eager to join the international community? As communism collapsed elsewhere after the end of the Cold War, China is becoming an emerging global power practicing “socialism with Chinese characteristics”. How do we understand and analyze China’s relations with the rest of the world? This course examines China’s interaction with the rest of the world since 1949, with reference on competing perspectives including power-political, economic inter-dependence and historical-cultural analysis. The course concludes with a critical assessment of China’s position in a globalizing world.

Assessment: 100% coursework.

POLI3060. Public financial management (6 credits)

The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of financial management in the public sector from a theoretical and practical perspective. The focus is primarily on the conceptual, methodological and institutional aspects of public expenditure and revenue management. The subject is approached largely from an economic standpoint, but there is also some exposure to accounting principles. However, no previous knowledge of either economics or accounting is assumed.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination.

POLI3061. Hong Kong and South China: the political economy of regional development and cooperation (6 credits)

The growing integration between Hong Kong and South China has profound implications not only for this region, but also for China and Asia as a whole. This course aims to analyze such an important development and its many implications. It is divided into three parts. Part I offers an overview of the development of the South China region. Theoretical approaches in the study of regionalism, intergovernmental relations and globalization and their relevance for understanding South China will also be examined. Part II analyzes the social, economic and political links between Hong Kong and Greater China and the development experience of South China since the late 1970s. Part III will focus on several key issues in regional development and cooperation in the South China region, including intergovernmental cooperation mechanisms, economic and technological development, demographic flows, boundary control, transportation and infra-structural development, as well as environmental management.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination.

POLI3064/LLAW3080. Governance and law (6 credits)

This course seeks to understand why the state regulates certain activities and behaviour in society, what different forms of regulation exist, when and what kind of legal regulation is deemed necessary, how legal regulation is enforced, and checks balances against abuse in enforcement. This course is jointly taught by staff from the Department of Politics and Public Administration and the Department of Law. The main objective of the course is to explore the interface between the study of Politics and Law in understanding governance. Relevant case studies will be included for illustration and discussion.

Assessment: 50% examination, 30% research paper, 20% group project presentation.

POLI3065. Public organization and management (6 credits)

This course examines theories of organization for understanding organizational phenomena and discusses potential strategies for enhancing organizational performance. The class draws on studies and practices of organizations from different sectors as learning materials. Emphasis is placed on the application of theory to various organizational settings including public, private and nonprofit organizations. Through exposing students to various streams of organization literature, the course aims to develop students’ ability to understand systematically and analyze critically organizational phenomena. By the end of the semester, students will be equipped with some basic tools for improving organizational performance.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3067. Liberalism and its limits (6 credits)

This course explores a set of fundamental issues in liberalism. Liberalism, which is arguably the most influential tradition of political theory today, is about the proper scope of individual freedom and state power. Some of the issues to be discussed in this course are: What is freedom and what is its ground? Under what conditions should the state interfere with individual freedom? Should the state ban or discourage unethical or worthless ways of life? Should the state coerce people for their own good? Should we have the freedom to exclude people whom we don’t like? What is so valuable about personal autonomy? The course aims to assess the strengths and limits of liberalism by examining the arguments for and against the liberal views on these issues.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3069. Public policy, politics and social change (6 credits)

It is a common belief that public policies aim to control socially harmful behavior and to advance desirable, collective societal ends. Contrary to this belief, some policies have only served as tools to strengthen political and economic power of certain groups (or countries) at the expense of others. This course examines this dark side of public policies by addressing critical questions that include: whose interests are reflected in the policies? what are the institutional sources of policies/decisions? how does the powerful manipulate public opinion? who benefits and who pays for the costs of these policies in what ways? etc. By exploring answers to these questions, students are expected to identify sources of widespread injustice in contemporary societies. To conceptualize the core ideas, the course engages in the analysis of propaganda techniques, U.S. foreign policy, and the distribution of hazardous wastes, etc. The course will consist of a combination of lectures and group discussions. Active class participation is required.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3070. Language and advice in politics and public administration (6 credits)

How does language relate to political life and the practice of public administration? The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the study and use of language in politics and public administration. This course will introduce students to the use of political language as an important part of political practice and political philosophy. Students will be introduced to the idea of political language as an historically and culturally contingent form of communication that shapes and is shaped by the institutions of the state. Students will come to understand the importance of deploying political language clearly for the task of advising political leaders on policy choices while facing civil servants and ordinary citizens. Students will apply the knowledge they gain in this course to their political environment by composing letters and/or memos offering advice to political and civil service leaders on important policy matters currently facing Hong Kong.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3072. Normative theory of public administration (6 credits)

In this course students will explore dominant theoretical paradigms of the study of public administration with the goal of identifying and critiquing the norms that inform the theories themselves and subsequent related empirical studies. Normative questions that will be probed in this course include: Who are public administrators? How do public administrators gather knowledge? How ought this knowledge be deployed and to what ends? What role to public administrators play in establishing and maintaining the good life? Are public administrators political actors? How do public administrators and public administration fit into the theoretical study of politics?

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3075/LLAW3142. Law and politics of constitutions (6 credits)

Almost all modern states are constitutional states in the sense that they, in one form or the other, have a constitution. A constitution is not only a legal document; it is also a political instrument.
For what purpose was the constitution made; for what functions could it serve; and on which it can be sustained are questions that cannot be answered without considering the interaction between law and politics in the making, implementation and development of the constitution.
This course applies an interdisciplinary approach and a comparative perspective to analyze intertwining issues of law and politics concerning constitutions like: constitutional interpretation theories, the roles of political parties, religion, judiciary and the public in the constitutional processes, and the significance of dialogue in constitutional deliberation.

Assessment: 50% open book examination, 30% research paper, 20% group project presentation

POLI3076. Special topics in international relations: understanding US-China relations (6 credits)

This course will focus on some major topics in international politics.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3077. Special topics in comparative politics - Introduction to Latin American History, Politics, Economy, and Contemporary Developments (6 credits)

This course will focus on some major topics in comparative politics. Specific titles and course descriptions are available in the department website.

This course is intended to act as an introduction and background to Latin America, with a view to understanding and interpreting the region’s increasing significance in contemporary global political and economic relations. For example, China’s growing interest in Latin America as a strategic and commercial partner.

The course will begin with a historical background to Latin America, which is essential for understanding the region’s political and economic trajectory. This will include such issues as: the region’s incorporation into the European trading system in the 19th century; 20th Century attempts at nation building and autonomous development; the economic, geographical and cultural diversity of the region; US foreign policy; dictatorship and democracy; the 1980s debt crisis and the rise of neo-liberal economics; alternatives to neo-liberalism – the Bolivarian Alliance for the Americas (ALBA) and the influence of Cuba; shifting global alliances with particular reference to the involvement of China and Russia in the region.

The aim of the course is to stimulate an interest in Latin America and an appreciation of its relevance to contemporary global developments and will be a useful asset for those who wish to have a better understanding of the region and are seeking careers particularly in politics, diplomacy, international business or finance, or have an interest in further research.

This course is an introduction to Latin America in preparation for further study, or to give a grounding to those wishing to do business, represent a company, organization, or government in the region. The course will examine:

  1. A historical background of Latin America
  2. Key themes and issues influencing the region
  3. Explore the diversity of the region
  4. Themes and problems of development
  5. The cultural context
  6. Contemporary issues
  7. The future

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3078. Humanity in globalization (6 credits)

The study of globalization occurs at differing levels of analysis. System level studies, for example, may focus on the interactions between states and multinational corporations. Population level studies focus on the impact that globalizing forces inflict upon distinct populations, variously defined as either small groups, threatened cultures, or prospering nations. The intent of this course is to introduce students to the study of globalization at the population level, with an explicit focus on small groups defined by a variety of characteristics such as age, race, ethnicity, language, or religious affiliation. Topics of study will include: current global issues such as human resources and migration; countering violent extremism; gender justice; humanitarian intervention and the responsibility to protect; sustainable development and patterns of consumption; and the economic and social impact of rapid technological change.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3079. Global justice (6 credits)

This course provides an introduction into some of the main issues in the field of global justice, such as legitimacy and authority in international politics, self-determination, human rights, global distributive justice and the normative relations between the rich and the poor, the significance of borders, and immigration

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3080. Global political economy (6 credits)

This course explores the political dimensions of global economic relations. The objectives of this course are to give students a better appreciation of major problems and dilemmas of contemporary global economy and to provide a conceptual framework for addressing policy problems in the global economy. We begin by examining several contending perspectives on global political economy. The course then examines distinct issue areas: globalization, development, trade, capital flows, financial crises, multinational production, environmental degradation, world hunger, and the transnational movement of people.
The aim of this course is to provide a political economy understanding of the process of globalisation, and to analyse: its manifestations and implications; the roles of finance, economics, politics, and its possibilities and problems.
The course will begin with an overview of the discipline of political economy and how this applies to the study of globalisation. This will be followed by an historical background to globalisation and how it became the dominant force in the 1980s. Based on this understanding, we will examine: the rise of global financial markets; transnational production; political power structures; governmental policy making issues and the relationship between globalisation and: the state; culture; democracy and emerging economies development, including the BRICS. Currently globalisation is facing structural problems and particularly strains on the international financial system which were revealed by the financial contraction of 2008. As Western nations, in particular, struggle to find solutions to this crisis, with unemployment, recession and unsustainable debt affecting many countries, questions are being posed about the future of the international order. Can the US dollar continue to operate as the global reserve currency? Are China and Russia in a position to play a more active role in global finance and trade? Is a Euro-Asian trade zone emerging? What are the global implications of the Trans Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) between the US and the European Union. These are some of the questions that will be addressed in an attempt to understand the current juncture of globalisation.
This course is designed for all those with an interest in global political and economic events and will also be useful for students with a more national focus, as the implications of globalisation are being felt even at the local level. Those seeking employment in public administration, politics, business, and many other careers will derive useful information and perspectives from this course.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3081. Workshop in Global Studies (6 credits)

This course gives students the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills gained in their global studies courses by engaging in interactive problem-solving exercises led by members of the community engaged in the process of creating globalization and/or protecting local identities. Through the use of interactive media, research-intensive teaching methods, and interactive, community-led lectures, students will gain knowledge of the nuances and contours of global issues. Students will produce joint position papers and debates on policy arenas discussed, taking into account their role as social innovators and global citizens.

Assessment: 100% coursework.

POLI3085. Globalization and healthcare policy (6 credits)

Modern states spend increasing amounts of their budgets on healthcare. Consumers also spend ever larger amounts of their income on health related services and products. How governments respond to the healthcare needs of citizens is a defining aspect of that government. In this course, students will examine the public healthcare systems of nations around the world, focusing on issues of basic healthcare provision, healthcare funding and insurance, regulation of healthcare, inclusion of advanced healthcare techniques (i.e., ECMO treatment of neonates, care of brain-dead individuals, genomic medicine, and organ transplantation), and public healthcare administration in the face of global health threats (i.e. influenzas, SARS, and MDR/XDR TB). Having taken this course, students will be familiar with one aspect of the global conduct of domestic politics.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3086. Leadership skills in Public Administration (6 credits)

The policy making and management structure of the HKSAR Government have undergone major developments in the past ten years. Significant changes are expected in the next ten years with the expansion of the Accountability System, the increasing influence of the media and various civic groups, and the need to make arrangements for the introduction of universal suffrage in the election of the Chief Executive and the Legislative Council in 2017 and possibly 2020 respectively. University graduates considering a career in the public service will benefit from a good understand of the formal and informal decision-making and management process within the government. The course will also provide students with practical management and public presentation skills when they start their career upon graduation. This course will explain the constitutional, policy making and management framework of the HKSAR government and associated major recent developments, the changing role of the civil service, particularly the Administrative Service, and the impending changes to public governance in the next ten years and beyond.
The primary focus of the course is to develop the students’ management and public presentation skills through various exercises such as discussions, written assignments, projects and presentations on selected topics. Students attending this course are expected to participate actively in these exercises.

Assessment: 100% coursework.

POLI3088. Human security in the global context (6 credits)

What is Human Security? How does the security and well-being of the individual relate to the security of the state? When we look around the world today, are our national security apparatuses providing us with the security that we need? Human Security refers to an emerging paradigm for understanding global politics whose proponents believe that the world requires a more comprehensive notion of security, one that marries the traditionally separate fields of development and defense studies and links the traditionally opposing principles of human rights and state sovereignty. Human Security proponents argue that today’s security threats go beyond our traditional understanding of defense threats, (e.g. attack from another state) to include poverty, economic inequality, diseases, human rights abuses, environmental pollution, and natural disasters. This course will review the emergence of and major themes behind the Human Security paradigm and will ask if and how Human Security can be meaningfully applied in a policy context. The use of real-world case studies and simulation exercises throughout the course uses will help students understand and apply the material covered. Students are encouraged to make their own critical judgments about the value of the Human Security agenda towards the end of the course.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3089. Global studies intership (12 credits)

Global Studies Internships seek to enhance students’ understanding and skills of managing development in a globalized world through conducting development projects coordinated by international development organizations and academic extension units. Students taking Global Studies Internships will explore the intersection of theoretical learning of Global Studies and development works in a globalized world. Students will be involved in the actual planning, management, and delivery of development projects that seek to empower local communities to cope with problems ranging from environment protection to disaster management, natural resource conservation to community building in developing countries.
The Global Studies internship is comprised of two components. The first is a series of workshops and sessions, aiming at equipping students with knowledge about development issues, essential techniques for conducting development works and essential skills for working with international development agencies. The second is work placements in different international development organizations. Students will work closely with staff of host organizations for development projects. Global Studies Internship will take place during summer semester.
On completion of the Global Studies Internship, students are required to give a presentation on what they have learned and achieved in the internships and to produce an extensive report critically reflecting upon their experiences after engaging in development works.
This course can be taken for fulfilling the Faculty’s Global Citizenship requirement. If students take such option, they are required to complete another 12 credits from the PPA course list for fulfilling the major or minor requirement.

Assessment:    100% coursework
                            -Workshop assignments (20%)
                            -Placement performance (40%)
                            -Final report and presentation (40%)

Attention: Students taking this course may have to bear the costs of passage, course fees, and other expenses overseas.

POLI3091. History of western political thought (6 credits)

This course serves as an introduction and survey of the major currents of western political thought. The material surveyed in this course includes a chronology of major texts of political theory, starting with the early Greeks and ending with thinkers emblematic of the advent of modern liberalism. Students enrolled in this course will gain competencies in the study of politics as a unique human endeavor, with attention paid to major themes and debates in the history of political thought. These themes include the nature of man as political animal, the role of the individual and the community as center of political decision-making, the shape of the office of authority, and the theory of the state. Having taken this course, students will be fluent in the description of individual thinkers and their relationship to one another, as well as the relationship of prominent thinkers' arguments to current political debates and political practices around the globe.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination.

POLI3093. Understanding social protest (6 credits)

From Hong Kong’s political demonstration on July 1st to the protest rally organized by your student union, social protest is undoubtedly an important form of politics. Outside of the formal and institutionalized channels, people do take politics onto the streets and use disruptive means to achieve political ends from time to time. This course seeks to provide students with grounding in the basic tools of understanding social protest and social movement. In addition to Hong Kong, cases will be drawn from many different countries—from the American civil rights movement to the 2007 democratic demonstrations in Burma, from Gandhi’s satyagraha (non-violent resistance) to the more recent “color revolutions” in Europe and Central Asia etc. Students will also learn about influential social movement leaders past and present, such as Martin Luther King, Gandhi, Mandela, Mao, Lech Walesa, Aung San Suu Kyi and more.

Eligibility: Students who have taken CCCH9009 are not allowed to take this course. This is a seminar course for Years 3 and 4 students only.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3094. Political participation: why and how? (6 credits)

Why and how do people participate in politics? What are the channels through which people make their voices heard and interests represented? Why does political participation take different forms in different countries? Why is participation important for democracy to sustain and non-democracies to change? This course will examine the dynamics and patterns of political participation in both democratic and non-democratic societies. Topics will cover voting & election, political party, representative institution, public opinion, civic organization, mass media, lobbying, interest group and informal politics in democratic societies as well as the modes, scope and impact of political participation under non-democratic regimes.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3095. Civil society and governance (6 credits)

The main objective of the course is to help students understand the concept of civil society, its historical circumstances and theoretical approaches, and the role of civil society in public governance. Topics include conceptions of civil society in the history of political thought and contemporary discourse; roles and impacts of civil society; trends of civil society development; theoretical approaches to civil society; social movements; legitimacy and accountability of civil society organizations; legal framework for civil society organizations, and the role of civil society in public governance.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3096. Citizenship, culture and community (6 credits)

This module surveys major debates surrounding citizenship, culture and community in political thinking. It addresses important questions such as: Should citizens assume an active role in political life? Is it ever justifiable for citizens to break the law? What is the value of culture and community? How does the experience of ‘multiculturalism’ challenge traditional conceptions of citizenship and community? Is nationalism a positive or negative ethos in political communities? Are political communities being transformed by globalization? Is there any such thing as ‘global citizenship’?

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3097. Modernity and globalization (6 credits)

The concept of ‘modernity’ refers to a series of developments that transformed the world in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, such as the emergence of the modern state, democracy, capitalism and modern industry. The concept of ‘globalization’ refers to a series of similar dynamics in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, such as the emergence of global governance, new forms of global trade and industry, and apparent transformations in cultures and societies. This module surveys some of the most important debates about modernity and globalization in social and political thought, addressing important questions such as: What does it mean to be ‘modern’? Is modernity a distinctively ‘Western’ experience? What is ‘globalization’? Is globalization a transformation or continuation of modernity? Does globalization mark the ‘triumph’ of the ‘West’?

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3098. Nonprofit management (6 credits)

This course is designed to advance students’ understanding of the management and operation of organizations in the nonprofit sector. In particular, it examines issues unique to the governance and administration of nonprofits, including board management, fundraising, philanthropy, nonprofit accounting and reporting, leadership, and network management. Students will learn both the theories and practical techniques required for an effective manager in nonprofit organizations.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3099. Perspectives and practice in world politics (6 credits)

This is an intermediate level course in international relations. The objectives of this course are to encourage students to think critically about core scholarly readings in the field of international relations, and to provide a conceptual framework for addressing policy problems in world politics. We begin by examining several contending perspectives on international relations. The course then examines distinct issue areas: international economy, war, terrorism, environment, regional integration, globalization, and international institutions.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3100. Social contracts (6 credits)

The course will introduce students to the three major traditions of social-contract theory, viz. the Hobbesian (“Classical”), Lockean (“Medieval”), and Rousseauean (“Modern”) traditions. They will not only learn about the intellectual history of each of these traditions but also examine their central texts in detail: Thomas Hobbes’ Leviathan, John Locke’s Second Treatise, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s Social Contract, respectively. Moreover, the course will emphasize their frequently overlapping concepts and concerns, including consent, equality, liberty, property, autonomy, the state of nature, commercial society, democratic self-government, and popular revolution.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3101. Human rights and culture differences (6 credits)

The first part of the course introduces some of the best theories of human rights. The focus will be on theories (e.g. Gewirth, Griffin) which closely associate rights with the nature of human beings. We shall then examine whether the view of human nature at the basis of these theories is constrained by the culture in which they evolved. In the course of this investigation, we shall discuss various specific rights (against poverty; free speech) and thorny issues (positive vs. negative rights – who has the duties to provide?).

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3102. Science, technology and public policy (6 credits)

The course will introduce students to the vocabulary and issues related to governance, particularly public policy making, in a scientifically and technologically advanced society.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3103. Politics of the Global South (6 credits)

The course will introduce students to the main debates and to some of the basic concepts and skills used in the analysis of the politics of the Global South. The course will combine theoretical perspectives with case studies, and will focus on a series of issues relevant to understanding political processes in the Global South. The course will explore the genealogy of the “Third World” concept and its mutation into the “Global South”, historical processes of decolonization, and some of the political challenges facing the postcolonial world. Furthermore, lectures will cover topics such as development and modernization, migration and mobility, human security and political violence, environmental degradation and processes of urbanization, the emergence of global cities, and human rights and democratization.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3110. Dilemmas of humanitarian intervention (6 credits)

To examine dilemmas of humanitarian intervention, the course looks not only at states but also at INGOs and the aid business, and not only at aid but also at wider forms of political engagement. It focuses on (a) the emergence of humanitarian intervention, (b) its contemporary nature, (c) success and failure, (d) moral challenges, and (e) ways forward. It requires small groups of course participants to select one developing country for in-depth study, both to deepen their learning and to build a platform for comparative analysis in class.

Note: Students who have taken CCGL9036 Dilemmas of humanitarian intervention are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination.

POLI3111. Social entrepreneurship and cross-sector collaboration (6 credits)

Societies and the challenges they face have become ever more complex. Existing institutions and many public policies may no longer be capable of addressing the new generations of social problems. Social entrepreneurship involves the recognition of a social problem and application of entrepreneurial principles to organize, create, and manage a venture to effect social change. This course aims to provide students with an overview of the emerging field of social entrepreneurship that navigates across different societal sectors and aspires to apply innovative, entrepreneurial approaches to address many intractable social problems. The course seeks to stimulate students to think creatively of potential solutions and address the challenges of cross-sector collaboration in tackling public policy challenges.



Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3112. Public policy and institutional analysis (6 credits)

Public policy making, institutional design, and implementation are key issues in the study of public administration. In this course, students will gain an understanding of the policy making process from choosing the appropriate institutional structure to policy evaluation to managing different societal relations. With reference to some of the classics in the literature, various theories and concepts will be examined. To enhance students’ understanding and making the theoretical ideas come to life, examples from Hong Kong and other comparative contexts will be discussed.



Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3113. On the ethics of violence (6 credits)

This course discusses issues like the ethics of self- defense, punishment, necessity justifications for violence, torture, war, revolution and terrorism. It will also show that the ethics of violence is fundamental for a proper understanding of certain basic problems and principles in political philosophy and in the organisation of human societies.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3114. Understanding fair trade: a global movement (6 credits)

In the age of globalization, “free trade” has become the world order and mantra for development, but the neoliberal promise has not always materialized for the poor countries. The fair trade movement developed in response, not only aiming to give producers a “fair” wage, but also build a direct and more equal relationship between producer and consumer. But how should the movement position itself when it is both “in and against” the market? What price does it have to pay to grow its influence? Can it master the game of corporate business without losing itself? Is the involvement of big multinational corporations a good thing? This course provides an overview of the fair trade movement and explores the challenges it faces, such as its promotion in the world’s freest economy—Hong Kong.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3115. Politics and public opinion (6 credits)

Public opinion is crucial for political actors to maintain their legitimacy, while opinion surveys have become an essential part of any modern liberal democratic society. Although Hong Kong is far from being a democratic society, its governance is heavily influenced by public opinion. This course examines the role of public opinion in the policy and electoral cycles of Hong Kong, with reference to different types of opinion surveys, including instant, tracking, panel, rolling, deliberative, and exit surveys. The process of opinion formation and the impact of opinion surveys at different stages of the policy and electoral cycles will be examined.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3116. Theories and practice of social leadership (6 credits)

The aim of this course is to give students a fundamental and practical understanding of social leadership. It is designed for students from a variety of backgrounds, cultures, and experiences in summer internships and extra-curricular activities. As society becomes increasingly diversified that calls for social innovation and requires high adaptability and contextual intelligence of social leaders, students need to be equipped with mindsets and skill-sets that cross over various sectors in public administration, business, society and the academia. The purpose of this course is to significantly increase students’ capacity to sustain the demands of leadership and to strengthen students’ ability to exercise both leadership and authority.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3117. Special topics in public policy (6 credits)

This course aims to provide introduction into the principles of environmental policy. This course will introduce fundamental theories and basic principles applied to environmental policy analysis. This course will help students to understand how economic incentives originate environmental problems and what roles government and public policy play. This course continues with discussions on various environmental policy issues, including international issues and energy.

On successful completion of the programme, students should

  1. Understand the primary principles in environmental policy;
  2. Discuss governmental intervention in environmental issues and its impact on both the society and the natural environment;
  3. Critically think the current environmental issues.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3118. Special topics in NGO studies: Power v.s. Empower: Philanthropy and Fundraising (6 credits)

Philanthropy -- “the love of humankind” - is a source of power and can also empower.

Why and how do people donate money, time, or for that matter blood or organs? The World Giving Index ranks Hong Kong as top in the East Asian Region, so what are the characteristics of the philanthropy culture of Hong Kong compared with the West? How can private resources be leveraged for public good? How can one gain these resources in order to realize one’s mission?

Instead of conventional lectures, the course will be conducted in seminar and workshop mode, with an emphasis on the dramatics of persuasion and creativity. Students will role-play as grant-makers and grant-seekers respectively to explore the mindset and behaviour of Giving and Asking. They will meet the real-life benefactors and beneficiaries. Students will present projects to guest donor-panels, learn how to develop a case for support, find means to build social capital, and be introduced to mission-driven careers.

The course is case-based. We will analyse the aims, motivations and expectations of philanthropists and foundations. We will examine how NGOs can achieve their goals with entrepreneurial spirit and innovation. Stories of success, effectiveness and failure, including those from the latest news, will all be discussed. We will scrutinise the fundamental principles in rallying community support, the protocols of Giving and Asking in the public sphere, the relevance to public policy and administration, and most importantly the values underpinning these actions in civil society.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3119. Causes of international war (6 credits)

This course studies the causes of war. Competing theories of war are discussed; different methods of testing the theories are considered; and illustrative historical cases are examined, with a focus on East Asia. Also covered are the implications of nuclear weapons on international security, and the consequences of war on societies and individual human lives. This is an advanced course that includes a major research investigation project.

Note: Students who took POLI3076 in 2013-14 or 2014-15 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3120. Governing Greater China: The challenge of intergovernmental relations and regional development (6 credits)

This course aims to examine the changing relations between Mainland China and Hong Kong, Taiwan and Macau, with a focus on the roles played by Hong Kong in China's development. This course is organized into three parts. Part I overviews major concepts and approaches in the study of intergovernmental relations and regional development, the historical development of central-local relations in contemporary China, and the changing links between Hong Kong and the Mainland in the pre-1997 and post-1997 periods. Part II examines several key topics, such as the role of Hong Kong in China's economic reform and development, cross-boundary cooperation between Hong Kong and south China, China's regional development and competition between Hong Kong and other cities, as well as the politics of identify and social integration between the two areas. Part III explores the prospect of intergovernmental relations and regional development in Greater China by examining the cases of Taiwan and Macau and their implications for Hong Kong's role in the development of this region.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3121. Environmental policy (6 credits)

This course aims to provide introduction into the principles of environmental policy. It introduces fundamental theories and basic principles applied to environmental policy analysis. This course will help students to understand how economic incentives originate environmental problems and what roles government and public policy play. This course continues with discussions on various environmental policy issues, including international issues and energy.

Eligibility: Students who took POLI3117 in 2014-15 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3122. Strategic leadership in civil society organisations (6 credits)

This course is designed to advance students’ understanding of strategic leadership civil society organizations (CSOs). Strategic leadership involves interpreting the environment, crafting strategies, and building an organization that thrives in dynamic environments. A vibrant civil society calls for strategic leadership that goes beyond a single agency’s interest, is driven by a collective vision and drives social change. In addition to learning theories of strategic leadership, students will practice strategic thinking and gain a deeper understanding of development of strategies in response to challenges arising from changing social needs, growing demands for social services and collective action problems in service provision.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3123. Politics of the two Koreas (6 credits)

This course examines political actors, processes, and issues in domestic politics and foreign relations of South and North Korea since 1945. It will begin with a brief overview of the shared historical origins of political institutions in the two Koreas, and move onto in-depth surveys about the divergent institutional, economic, and foreign relations paths that North and South Korea took after the Korean War. The third part of the course is devoted to the analysis about the contemporary inter-Korean relations, focusing on the causes and consequences of military tensions, nuclear crises, and various dialogues and cooperation initiatives since 1990. Lastly, it will discuss how the political and economic developments in the two Koreas affect and are influenced by the regional and international relations.

Eligibility: Students who have taken POLI3076 in 2015-16 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3124. Justice and good life (6 credits)

This course explores some of the basic issues in the debate between liberal neutrality and state perfectionism, which are at the core of liberal political theory. These issues include: What should be the relationship between the good life and social justice? Should a liberal state pursue social justice but not any kind of human good, such as knowledge and art? Can there be any objective knowledge about the good life? Is state promotion of the good life necessarily unfair to people who live in many different ways? In addition, if you care about injustice and poverty, how come you are so rich (or you want to be rich)? We shall also discuss some of the theories of prominent philosophers including Wilhelm von Humboldt, Karl Marx, J.S. Mill, John Rawls, and Joseph Raz. The course aims to enhance students’ abilities to appreciate some of the main arguments in political theory and formulate their own views on a wide range of social and political issues. This is an advanced course in political theory. It is strongly recommended that students who want to take this course have already studied the gateway course “Introduction to political theory” and have a serious interest in political theory.

Eligibility: Students who took POLI3002 in 2016-17 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3125. Political disagreement and philosophical issues (6 credits)

How should we deal with disagreements in politics? Not all political disagreements are mere conflicts of interests; many political disagreements stem from moral disagreements. People have moral disagreements about how justice should be realised, how equality should be understood, etc. But how moral disagreement should be understood? Does moral disagreement imply moral relativism or moral subjectivism? Our answers to these questions have a lot to do with how we understand the nature of politics and how to deal with political disagreements.
One response to political disagreement is that citizens should be willing to understand each other. If so, intellectual virtues seem to be extremely important for citizens’ political deliberation. Intellectual virtues are the personal qualities of a good thinker or learner. They may include qualities such as open-mindedness, intellectual courage, and intellectual modesty.
This course explores issues about the nature of moral disagreement and how intellectual virtues may have positive contributions to the formation of our moral beliefs and political views. In addition, the course considers whether or not the state should promote intellectual virtues as civic virtues.
This is an advanced course in political theory. It is strongly recommended that students who intend to take this course have already studied the gateway course “Introduction to political theory” and have a serious interest in political theory or political philosophy.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3126. Politics of contemporary Japan (6 credits)

This course examines the politics of contemporary Japan. After a brief historical review, we survey the core political institutions of the postwar era, explore the interaction of political leaders, political parties, the bureaucracy and interest groups, with an emphasis on the ongoing transformation of the Japanese political system. We focus particularly on political changes since 1993, including the new electoral system and party realignment. Special attention is devoted to contemporary issues, such as foreign policy, economic policy, national security and administrative reform.

Eligibility: Students who took POLI3001 in 2015-16 or 2016-17 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3127. The politics of the European Union (6 credits)

The European Union (EU) is a unique experiment in transnational cooperation. It is neither a state nor an international organization, but it has characteristics of both. It aims to promote unity amongst its member states, while also accommodating their diversity. It struggles to maintain external borders, while striving to remove internal borders. The EU today faces a number of challenges – making its study timely and relevant for those who wish to understand the state of global politics.
This course traces the development of the EU from its postwar origins to its transformation into a major economic and political actor in the 21st century. We will study the EU’s political structures, its legal framework, its relationship with its member states, and its process of enlargement. We will also study some of the recent crises that threaten European unity, including the euro crisis and Brexit.

Eligibility: students who took POLI3076 in 2016-17 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI4046.Thesis in politics and public administration (12 credits, 100% coursework)

This is a two-semester project catered for highly motivated students that are interested in graduate studies and research careers. The course should be taken during the senior year under the supervision of a faculty member. The thesis should be at least 10,000 words long and individually written. It is expected to be a substantive piece of scholarship that demonstrates critical reflections and original research findings on a topic agreed by the supervisor. Students must have achieved a cumulative GPA of at least 3.5. They should submit a research proposal to their intended supervisor and secure the latter’s agreement to supervise their thesis before enrolling in the course.

Assessment: 100% coursework.

POLI4110. Advanced seminar I: State-society relations in Hong Kong (6 credits)

The aim of this seminar is to understand the interaction between the state and society in Hong Kong from various perspectives, with attention on the development after 1997. Topics to be covered include: the nature of the political regime, public governance, political development, political economy, civil society, and social movement. While the focus is on Hong Kong, substantial portion of the reading and thus the seminar discussion will be widely drawn from the general literature. A strong emphasis of the seminar is to explore how the relevant literature will inform us about the study of Hong Kong and vice versa.

This course is offered for PPA major / minor students only. Non-PPA students who wish to take this course must seek prior approval from the instructor.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI4111. Advanced seminar II (6 credits)

This is a discussion-based course for senior year students with strong academic interest in specialized and in-depth study of one or more topics in a small class setting. The topical focus of the seminar will depend on the area specialty of the instructor. Students are expected to read intensively and contribute fruitfully to seminar discussions.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI4112. Advanced seminar III (6 credits)

This is a discussion-based course for senior year students with strong academic interest in specialized and in-depth study of one or more topics in a small class setting. The topical focus of the seminar will depend on the area specialty of the instructor. Students are expected to read intensively and contribute fruitfully to seminar discussions.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI4113. Advanced seminar IV (6 credits)

This is a discussion-based course for senior year students with strong academic interest in specialized and in-depth study of one or more topics in a small class setting. The topical focus of the seminar will depend on the area specialty of the instructor. Students are expected to read intensively and contribute fruitfully to seminar discussions.

Assessment: 100% coursework

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Advanced courses

ECON2276. State, law and the economy (6 credits)

Please refer to the School of Economics and Finance website for course description.

EUST3010. European political and economic institutions and processes (6 credits)

Please refer to the European Studies Programme website for course description.

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Faculty-level Courses

Introductory course

SINO1003. Greater China: A multi-disciplinary introduction (6 credits)

This course adopts multi-disciplinary perspectives to examine significant and complex issues of China in the past and present. With a general survey of China, this course discusses China’s historical development, revolutionary past, cultural traditions, formal political structure, the market-oriented economic reform, and geographic, demographic and linguistic diversity, as well as contemporary issues of environment, resistance and mass media. Central themes throughout the course include China’s cultural identity, ethnicity, state-society relations, continuities and changes in China’s socio-political values, and China’s role in the global order. The purpose of this course is to provide students with a base of knowledge of China’s historical and contemporary experiences and contexts. It aims to help students understand how China’s historical legacy impacted on today’s society, and how contemporary politics and economics transformed China in a comprehensive way.

Note: Students who have taken SINO1001 and SINO1002 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 100% coursework

Advanced course

SINO2003. Contemporary China studies: issues and perspectives (6 credits)

This course examines and unravels the key features and outcomes of China’s experiences/ model in reforms and development. After introductorylectures on the macro-development framework, students are required to form project groups and select key issues for presentations in a series of research seminars. Under the guidance of the courseteacher, project groups are expected to make investigation and data search on the selected issues. Current and emerging specific political, economic, and social issues/ phenomena may include: globalization and the Chinese economy, environmental protection, income disparity and poverty, civil service reform and corruption, population mobility and migrant workers, human resources and employment, regional development (Pearl River Delta), civil society, rural development, protest movements and social unrest, and various dimensions of integration in Greater China. Guest lecturers may be invited to participate in research seminars.

Assessment: 100% coursework

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